Roxi Mundel: A lot of joy in her works

ROXI MUNDEL’S son-in-law wrote in a condolence message that in his home he is surrounded by Roxi’s works of art – paintings and ceramics.   He sees through Roxi’s eyes moments frozen in time. Her unique interpretation of light and movement, the way she chose to emphasize on details to tell her story. There is a lot of joy in her works and these are the sentiments he is left with.   Artists have the privilege of staying with the living longer than other plain mortals.   

Roxi, the artist, was born and educated in Johannesburg, South   Africa. At school she excelled in the art classes and after matriculating she studied at the Technical School of Art and Design.   She then was employed painting huge posters advertising forthcoming movies. She designed and painted children’s peasant furniture which was sold in large stores.  She was engaged to her future husband who had enlisted in the army during World War Two, and after he returned from service abroad they married. In 1947 she accompanied him to London where she attended prestigious art schools – the Slade   School of Art, the Sir John Cass Art Academy, and the Edinburgh School of Art.   Roxi’s family was supportive of Zionist activities and she was intent on immigrating to Israel.   

In 1949, her husband received an urgent request to come to Israel to work as a pediatrician in the camp for Yemenite immigrants who had arrived on the Magic Carpet Operation.   Her first years in Israel were difficult as her husband was away for days at a time working in the camp at Rosh Haayin. She felt very lonely and isolated especially when her son was born in 1950 and she was house bound.   

When the camp closed in 1951 the  family moved to Haifa where she found many new friends and was happy and acclimatized to life in Israel. Her daughter was born in Haifa and soon afterwards the Mundels moved back to the Tel Aviv area. Roxi continued with her arts and crafts work and was one of the first in Israel to make batik which she supplied to Maskit. She worked as an art teacher at the American International School in Kfar Shmaryahu for a number of years.

Later she volunteered for 10 years at the Golden Age Club in Herzliya where she gave art classes and made friends with many of her pupils. She also found time to spend time with friends in the artist village of Ein Hod. Over 10 years ago Roxi moved to Protea Village in Tel Mond and adapted well to life there making many friends in the several art and craft classes she attended. Roxi was very innovative, continually looking for new media and methods in her work. She was modest, with a pleasant friendly personality. She is sorely missed. 

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